Kay and Nancy Oda

Pictured: Kay and Nancy Oda in front of Castlerock Mountain, California 2019

Nancy Kyoko Oda born on May 20, 1945 in Tule Lake Segregation Center and returned at age five months to Boyle Heights with the family. She attended Maryknoll School in Little Tokyo.

Later at UCLA, she was deeply moved to fight the injustices that her family endured.

By the time her two boys started middle school she began teaching. She retired thirty two years later as an elementary school principal in 2010.

In 2013, Nancy and her sister, Masako, met professor Masumi Izumi who was able to skillfully translate hunger strike written in kanji.

At the same time, she and husband, Kay, got involved with the Tuna Canyon Detention Station and took traveling exhibit to thirteen locations from San Diego to Portland Oregon.

Nancy’s parents were able to sustain themselves in camp and resettlement with love for each other and their family of three girls.

Nancy believes that she was born to share the story and fight against injustice.

View interview with Nancy.

Nancy Kyoko Oda born on May 20, 1945 in Tule Lake Segregation Center and returned at age five months to Boyle Heights with the family. She attended Maryknoll School in Little Tokyo.

Later at UCLA, she was deeply moved to fight the injustices that her family endured.

By the time her two boys started middle school she began teaching. She retired thirty two years later as an elementary school principal in 2010.

In 2013, Nancy and her sister, Masako, met professor Masumi Izumi who was able to skillfully translate hunger strike written in kanji.

At the same time, she and husband, Kay, got involved with the Tuna Canyon Detention Station and took traveling exhibit to thirteen locations from San Diego to Portland Oregon.

Nancy’s parents were able to sustain themselves in camp and resettlement with love for each other and their family of three girls.

Nancy believes that she was born to share the story and fight against injustice.

View interview with Nancy.